Overview About Contract Farming

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Posted on 4th October 2010 by Swapnil Waikar in Uncategorized

What is Contract farming?

Farming is an age-old means of livelihood for millions of Indians. However, there have been few systems/models in which farmers are assured of a market for their produce, leave alone a remunerative price.
Farmers have on occasion had to throw their produce away for want of buyers. This is one side of the coin. On the other is the agri-based and food industry, which requires timely and adequate inputs of good quality agricultural produce. This underlying paradox of the Indian agricultural scenario has given birth to the concept of Contract Farming, which promises to provide a proper linkage between the ‘farm and market. Farmers in India are all set to see a sea-change in agriculture sector soon, thanks to contract farming. contract farming is emerging as an important institutional arrangement in India that promotes coordination between production and marketing activities.
Contract farming involves a pre-agreed price between the company and the farmer. The agreement is defined by the commitment of the farmer to provide an agricultural commodity of a certain type at a time and a price and in the quantity required by a committed buyer, mostly a large company.
It is clear why the business sector is gunning for contract farming. They seek to integrate the supply chain to ensure timely availability of quality and quantity of raw material. Significantly, it also reduces the procurement cost for them by doing away with the middlemen. It leads to significant gains for them, as not only do they get the raw material as per their specific demands, the cost is also much less.
It is also believed that the participation of the corporate sector in the farming segment will play a crucial role in technology transfer, capital inflow as well as lead to assured markets for crop production.
The model which is most popular in the country today is the one in which the contractor supplies all the inputs required for cultivation, while the farmer supplies land and labour. However, the terms and nature of the contracts vary according to the crops grown, the agencies involved, the farmers themselves and technologies and the context in which contract farming is taken up. Generally, a farmer’s participation is limited to production in the fields.
However, in the present context, contract farming is clearly a win-win situation for both the corporates and the farmers. Agriculture sector is facing a number of problems in the country and farmers actually don’t have many options in the matter of deciding whether or not to go in for contract farming.
With rising debt and soaring seed and fertiliser costs, contract farming seems to be the only choice left open to them. This is mainly because the company provides all the material including seeds as well as technical know-how and there is also a guarantee of purchase of the produce after harvest. In most cases, the minimum price of the produce is fixed in advance. In the present scenario, the increasing number of farmers’ suicides is seen as a reflection of the fact that agriculture is no longer seen as a profitable venture.
This makes the economic security offered by the contract farming very attractive. The detractors of the contract farming believe that far from being a panacea for agriculture sector, contract farming is likely to increase the problems.
The main concern is that the land, which is currently used to grow staple crops like wheat and rice, will be used to grow crops required by the food-processing industry, which also has a significant overseas market. The switch to contract farming, therefore, leads to a rise in exports.
The main thing is that farmers don’t have any role to play in contract farming except providing the corporates with labour and land. About 70 per cent of the population is dependent on agriculture.

Contract farming is defined as a system for the production and supply of agricultural/horticultural produce under forward contracts between producers/suppliers and buyers. The essence of such an arrangement is the commitment of the producer/ seller to provide an agricultural commodity of a certain type, at a time and a price, and in the quantity required by a known and committed buyer.
Contract farming is an organizational arrangement that allows firms to participate in and exert control over the production process without owning or operating the farms. Independent growers perform the cultivation.

What are the different types of contracts?
The contracts can be classified into three, not mutually exclusive categories viz., market specification, resource providing and production management. The market specification contracts are pre-harvest agreements that bind the firm and grower to a particular set of conditions governing the sale of the crop. The conditions specify price, quality and pricing. Resource providing contracts oblige the processor to supply crop inputs, extension or credit, in exchange for a marketing agreement.
Production management contracts bind the farmer to follow a particular production method or input management, usually in exchange for a marketing agreement or resource provision. In various combinations these contract forms permit the firms to influence the production technology and respond to the markets without having to operate their own plantations.

Contract farming is not totally new to our country. When the white revolution was born in India, Contract farming also came into being by the introduction of Operation Flood I & II. Milk cooperatives of Gujarat under the banner Amul are running examples of a type of Contract farming. The Sugar Cooperatives of Maharashtra and also in many states, growing of fruit crops (papaya, passion fruit, pine apple) and seed cotton in Tamil Nadu on similar pattern, cultivation of oil seeds especially Sunflower in North are examples of the currently practiced systems of Contract farming.

Why Contract farming in India?
1. In our country the farmers face the problems of traditional technology and management practices, little bargaining power with input suppliers and produce markets, inadequate infrastructure and market information, lack of post-harvest
management expertise, poor package of produce and inadequate capital to grow a quality crop. They are waiting for change for better living standards.
2. Contract farming helps small farmers to participate in the production of high value crops like vegetables, flowers, fruits etc and benefit from market led growth.
3. Extensive areas are required by the Agroprocessors for an intensive cultivation to build an uniform method of cultivation that would reduce their production and transaction costs with the growers.
4. Effective & efficient monitoring of production operations, extension activities and credit delivery in a conjugal area is easy in Contract farming.
5. Contract farming will maximise the profits to the farmers and minimise risk in farming like production related risks, transfer price risk and produce risk.
6. There is a tendency amongst the users to go in for environmental friendly, value added quality agroproducts in their daily life.
7. The farmers find it easy to get under one roof inputs, technological & extension services, postharvest processing facilities and more importantly, the marketing of their produce with assured cash returns.
8. Contract farming facilitates more and more private Companies to develop backward linkages with the farmers.
9. Access to crop loans at attractive terms through tie-ups with Banks is facilitated through contract farming.
10. There is a tendency amongst farmers to go in for an alternate cropping systems for better monetary returns.

What is the present stage of contract farming in India?
The Union Agriculture Ministry is putting its weight behind contract farming drafting a model law to give legal support to a practice that can give small farmers access to modern technology and resources. An institutional mechanism is being contemplated to record contractual arrangements and help resolve possible disputes.

The farm ministry detailed an agenda for expansion of agricultural credit to the tune of Rs.7,36,570 cr. during 10th Plan and the official note to the finance ministry gave financing of contract farming by banks priority.

Agricultural and Processed Food Products Development Authority is developing policy guidelines on contract farming for forwarding to state governments for implementation. The guidelines will focus on regularising the relation between producers and processors of food materials. During this year, 20 Agri-Export zones will be set-up in different states that would integrate the complete process from production to export stage and contract farming is being
encouraged to rope in local farmers to join these export zones as members to pool in their produce.

The national agricultural policy, announced last year, had highlighted the need for an increase inthe private sector participation in farming by leasing private land for agri-business and contract farming to private companies.

The Standing Committee on Food Management and Agricultural Exports had recommended suitable amendments to the State Agricultural Produce Marketing Regulation Act to promote development of marketing infrastructure in private and co-operative sectors, direct marketing and contract farming.

Contract farming is already undertaken in tea estates by major companies including Pepsi Food, ITC, Hindustan Lever and for crop diversification by Mahindra Shubhlab Services with Punjab Agro Food grains Corporation;Escort Limited with Punjab Agro for Basmati rice and durum wheat besides drawing a plan to set up grain handling and storage facilities like conveyor belts and silos and earmarking Rs.1 billion for contract farming and creating post-harvest infrastructure in Punjab and other states in next 3 years.

Punjab plans to diversify crops in 1.5 million acres in next 4 years through contract farming. Already 3 lacs acres under contract farming have been diversified from paddy and wheat to commercial crops like maize, barley, white
mustard, Basmati rice and oil seeds during this year.

In Karnataka, wide varieties of vegetables, gherkins, lime, pomegranate, grapes for resins, pearl onions, asparagus and mangoes for pulp are already covered under contract farming.

Our Bank financed under contract farming to the tune of Rs.14.86 lacs in Villupuram, Chiitoor and Salem districts for gherkins,cotton, maize etc. Financing for medicinal plants has been taken up under contract farming.

What are the advantages for Bankers?
More coverage under credit to agriculture is facilitated with comparatively less production, processing and marketing risks with the spread of risk between different players in the field.

There will be reduction in transaction cost of lending as the intermediaries is less.

Banks can go in for diversification in financing practices and coverage of crops.

As there would be tie-up with reputed companies, the risk of NPA would be the least. The farmers realise remunerative and assured prices for their produce with better surplus that Banks could tap for their resources by way of deposits.

Being part of second green revolution it enhances the emotional bondage between farmer-banker relationship and thereby giving customer-delight to the backbone of this country viz. the farmers. To conclude, Contract farming is a ‘grow to order’ way of farming that facilitates easy access to millions of farmers for an assured and organized production, processing, marketing and credit linkages to usher in Green Revolution II in India.

Pros and cons of contract farming

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Posted on 4th October 2010 by Swapnil Waikar in Uncategorized

Farmers in India are all set to see a sea-change in agriculture sector soon, thanks to contract farming.

Winds of change are blowing across the Indian agricultural landscape with the advancement of contract farming. While earlier it was limited to a certain small initiatives by the corporate sector, it is likely to become a norm rather than exception, thanks to the entry of business giants like Reliance and ITC and also because of the encouraging change in the government policies.

The size of agreements for contract farming with the farmers is also increasing manifold. The central government is so serious about the issue that it is mulling a contract farming policy for India.

Recently, Union Agriculture Minister Sharad Pawar said contract farming is emerging as an important institutional arrangement in India that promotes coordination between production and marketing activities.

“The main issue is to upscale contract farming. This will require both public and private sector investments in roads, cold chains, electrification and processing,” he pointed out. The minister added that the government’s main concern is that smallholders are not left out in the process. He also asked agro-business firms to integrate farmers on their supply chains through institutions like cooperatives, producers’ associations and contract farming.

Pawar made it clear that the contract farming model that to be implemented in India will ensure that land is permanently owned and cultivated only by farmers. “We are not encouraging a model of leasing land and allowing the private sector to acquire it for cultivation,” he said. He also disclosed that the Centre is encouraging farmers to form grass-root level associations or informal cooperatives owned and managed by farmers themselves or producer companies.

While the corporates will have us believe that contract farming is the panacea for all the ills affecting the agriculture sector in the country today, it remains to be seen whether it really turns out to be so.

Contract farming involves a pre-agreed price between the company and the farmer. The agreement is defined by the commitment of the farmer to provide an agricultural commodity of a certain type at a time and a price and in the quantity required by a committed buyer, mostly a large company.

It is clear why the business sector is gunning for contract farming. They seek to integrate the supply chain to ensure timely availability of quality and quantity of raw material. Significantly, it also reduces the procurement cost for them by doing away with the middlemen. It leads to significant gains for them, as not only do they get the raw material as per their specific demands, the cost is also much less.

It is also believed that the participation of the corporate sector in the farming segment will play a crucial role in technology transfer, capital inflow as well as lead to assured markets for crop production.

PepsiCo was the first company in India to start contract farming of tomatoes in Hoshiarpur district of Punjab. Reliance Life Sciences, ITC (agri-business division) and McDonalds are some of the prominent business giants, which have either started contract farming projects already or are in the process of actively discussing them with various state governments. PepsiCo and other companies have used the contract system for the cultivation of Basmati rice, chilli and groundnut, as well as for vegetable crops such as potato.

“PepsiCo’s involvement in Indian agriculture stems from its vision of creating a cost-effective, localised agri-base in India by leveraging its access to world class agricultural practices,” PepsiCo spokesperson said.

Till today, PepsiCo India’s project with the Punjab Agro Industries Corporation and Punjab Agriculture University remains one of the most ambitious contracts farming projects in the country. “The programme focuses on evolving agricultural practices to help Punjab farmers produce crops that would make Indian products internationally competitive,” says the spokesperson.

What has been of crucial help to the business houses venturing into contract farming is the amendment of the Agriculture Produce Marketing Committee Act in 14 states, which allows farmers to sell their produce in open markets. This has opened the gates for the companies to enter this segment.

The United Progressive Alliance government’s ‘approach paper’ to the Eleventh Plan gives clear priority to the development of contract farming. A working group set up by the National Development Council has also made a set of proposals to promote contract farming. The group suggests greater liberalisation of laws and rules for crop contracts. It has also proposed tax rebates for food processing, duty-free imports of machinery and equipment and liberalised imports of seed varieties for contract farming.

The model which is most popular in the country today is the one in which the contractor supplies all the inputs required for cultivation, while the farmer supplies land and labour. However, the terms and nature of the contracts vary according to the crops grown, the agencies involved, the farmers themselves and technologies and the context in which contract farming is taken up. Generally, a farmer’s participation is limited to production in the fields.

However, in the present context, contract farming is clearly a win-win situation for both the corporates and the farmers. Agriculture sector is facing a number of problems in the country and farmers actually don’t have many options in the matter of deciding whether or not to go in for contract farming.

With rising debt and soaring seed and fertiliser costs, contract farming seems to be the only choice left open to them. This is mainly because the company provides all the material including seeds as well as technical know-how and there is also a guarantee of purchase of the produce after harvest. In most cases, the minimum price of the produce is fixed in advance. In the present scenario, the increasing number of farmers’ suicides is seen as a reflection of the fact that agriculture is no longer seen as a profitable venture.

This makes the economic security offered by the contract farming very attractive. The detractors of the contract farming believe that far from being a panacea for agriculture sector, contract farming is likely to increase the problems.

The main concern is that the land, which is currently used to grow staple crops like wheat and rice, will be used to grow crops required by the food-processing industry, which also has a significant overseas market. The switch to contract farming, therefore, leads to a rise in exports.

In fact, many corporates enter contract farming to fulfil their export obligations. It is believed that contract farming would double agriculture exports from India to $20 billion by 2010. Many believe that the rampant increase in contract farming will eventually lead to loss of food security of the country, implying that the country might become dependent on imports.

“We are bound to lose food security considering the way the government is supporting contract farming without thinking of farmers. The main thing is that farmers don’t have any role to play in contract farming except providing the corporates with labour and land. The government should also take into account that the situation is very different in our country as compared to other countries.
About 70 per cent of the population is dependent on agriculture. The government should involve the farmers in policy making otherwise their concerns are likely to be left out,” says Dr Kishan Bir Chaudhary of Bharat Krishak Samaj, which claims to represent around 5,000 farmers in the country.

There is also a belief that it might also lead to the loss of natural seeds. Many times, the crop required by the company is not recommended for that particular area. This can also have negative implications on the quality of soil.

There have been numerous studies to examine the impact of contract farming on farmers. Recently, Dr Sukhpal Singh of Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad , conducted a study – ‘Contract Farming for Agricultural Development: Experience of the Indian Punjab and Northern Thailand’. He observes in his study, “Contract farming, in a political economy, is one mode of capitalist penetration of agriculture for capital accumulation and exploitation of the farming sector by agri-business companies.”

But for farmers, this is a matter of survival. It is also because public institutions have failed to provide farmers with the essential protection and support required for viability on a sustained basis.

“Farming was hardly a profit making venture but thanks to the company people we also can afford to have some self-respect now. Of course, there are problems associated with companies also like if a crop doesn’t meet their requirements they will not take it. For instance, if they want chilli, it has to be a particular variety and it’s not like anything will do,” says Shirish Mane, who owns a 3-acre farm at Loni Khand village, about 20 kms from Pune.

Certainly, not all contract farming is bad for farmers. It can lead to sustainable cultivation practices. However, there is a need for the government to step in and monitor the contract farming practices.

About Agricultural Overview

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Posted on 4th October 2010 by Swapnil Waikar in Uncategorized

All the living beings depend on the plants for their own nutrition. Only plants can utilize energy from sunlight and convert it into required ingredients (nutrition). Plants are dependent on soil for supplements like minerals, vitamins, amino acids & water. Hence healthy soil is important for producing a healthy plant. In today’s world commercial era, there is a demand for continuous production from the soil and hence these vital supplements in the soil are drastically reduced. Excessive use of strong & expensive inorganic/chemical fertilizers has further affected the micro-flora of the soil. Due to this there are hardly any micro-organisms/earthworms left in the soil to decompose the nutrients from the soil and make it available in the form required by the plant. This intern reduces the supply of required nutrients and energy to the plant and has adverse effects on the production of the plant in terms of leaves, flower & fruits. The effect of such low quality agricultural produce is obviously observed in animals & human beings by way of various psychological & physical disorders.
To overcome this challenge, we offer you a rather simple, low cost and effective way to make all required nutrients, micro-organisms and energy available to the plant and soil in NANO form for faster, effective and complete absorption by the plant. We have more than 98 ingredients in our solutions which are “BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVATED PRODUCT FROM PLANT EXTRACTS” & are completely natural, organic, having “NO CHEMICALS” in it. We offer liquids to be sprayed on the plant with a soil mixture to be broadcasted for the enhancement of the soil.
India grows the largest number of vegetables from temperate to humid tropics and from sea-level to snowline, & they are excellent source of vitamins, particularly niacin, riboflavin, Thiamin and Vitamins A and C. They also supply minerals such as calcium, iron besides proteins and carbohydrates. Vegetables are known to be cheapest source of natural protective tools.
Most of the vegetables, being short duration crops, fit very well in the intensive cropping system and are capable of giving very high yields and very high economic returns to the growers besides providing better health standards to the people. India is the world’s largest producer of vegetable next only to China from approximately 4.5 million hectares. However, this hardly occupies 2 per cent of the total cropped area of the country which is very low in view of the national need. Hence it is necessary to increase the production and productivity of vegetable to meet the demand of growing population to ensure better nutrition by adopting improved technology.
Cole vegetables: – The major Cole crops are the cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and sprouting broccoli. All these vegetables have been originated from the wild cabbage, ‘Cole warts’ (Brassica oleracae Var sysvestris) which occurs along the Mediterranean coasts. All the Cole vegetables require cool season for growth and production of quality product. Among these, cabbage and cauliflower are grown on commercial scale in India. The crops like Brussels sprouts and sprouting Broccoli are grown on a very small scale and their area is scattered around.
Fruit Vegetables: – Fruit vegetables are widely cultivated throughout the country. The most important Fruit vegetables are: Tomatoes, Brinjal or egg plant chillies (Hot peppers) and Okra.
India with diverse agro-climatic conditions like good quality soils, suitable climate, and abundant water supply, low labour cost, India has identified floriculture as industry and accorded it 100 percent export oriented status. Owing to steady increase in demand of flower floriculture has become one of the important Commercial trades in India. Hence commercial floriculture has emerged as hi-tech activity-taking place under controlled climatic conditions inside greenhouse. The important flower trade in international markets are rose, carnation, chrysanthemum, gerbera, gladiolus, gypsophila, orchids, tulip, and lilies.
Commercial floricultural industry is becoming important from the export angle. The government of India offers tax benefits to new export oriented floriculture companies in the form of income-tax holidays and exemption from certain import duties. Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority ( APEDA), responsible for export promotion and development of floriculture in India, grants subsidies for establishing cold storage, pre cooling units, refrigerated vans and green houses, and air freight subsidy to exports. It has been found that commercial floriculture has higher potential per unit area than most of the field crops. Subsidy on airfreight for export of cut flowers and tissue-cultured plants is allowed by the Government. Import duties have been reduced on cut flowers, flower seeds, tissue-cultured plants, etc. Setting up of walk in type cold storage has been allowed at the International airports for storage of export produce.
More than 50% of the floriculture units are based in South zone mainly in Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, and Tamil Nadu. Also West Bengal, Maharashtra, Rajasthan have large areas under floriculture. The domestic flower production goes on increasing annually. Technical collaborations with foreign companies have been approved for India, in order to increase total share in the floriculture world trade.
India is vast country with diverse geographical aspects like soil and climate comprising several agro-ecological regions provides ample opportunity to grow a variety of horticulture crops.
Horticultural crops play an important role in improving India’s economy by generating employment in rural India. Cultivation of these crops is laborious, intensive. Fruits are also rich source of vitamins, minerals, proteins, and carbohydrates etc. which are essential in human nutrition. Thus, cultivation of horticultural crops plays a vital role in the prosperity of human beings and is directly linked with the health and happiness of the people.

Benifits of Nutrition in Cow

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Posted on 4th October 2010 by Swapnil Waikar in Uncategorized

Milkklik™

Milkklik™ is a product designed for cows and buffalos. We have two different versions as Milkklik™ Cow and Milkklik™ Buffalo. Contains are mainly same in both the products but have different potencies and strength. This product is mainly designed for maintaining the overall health and to increase the resistance power of cattle. It is found that most of cattle get ill due to lack of deficiencies in them, which also reduces their internal resistance power, which reduces the milk yield, further makes farmers to invest more on medicines, making loss in business. Hence, we at Nanosolutions™ have came with a unique product which has most of the minerals, vitamins & amino acids present in our product, helping the cattle to regain its health

Various Ingredients & there use which are present in Milkklik™

Carbohydrates: Helps in increasing size of cattle. Fulfils the loses and damages caused to cattle due to excessive workouts. Carbohydrates are found in maize, jowar, bajara, wheat, and oats.

Proteins: For hormonal changes. Increasing the calf size developing in body of cattle. Helps in digesting heavy food materials consumed by cattle. Proteins are found in cereal crops

Fats: Needed to fulfil the energy loses. Found in groundnuts. Needed for shining of skin, water balances in body, smoothness in hair, for peace of mind which helps in increase yield of milk production.

Fibres: Gives heat to body. Increases fat level in milk. Keeps stomach clean. Fibres are found in grass

Vitamins: Helps in digesting various minerals and elements in body. Helps in digestion of food

Vitamin A: Helps in increasing digestion power in animal. Increases eye sight power. Milk production does not hamper. If vitamin A increases in body, one can identify it by seeing yellowish colour in milk.

Vitamin B: Helps in developing microbes which helps in increasing the digestion power in plant

Vitamin B1: Uses sugar content in body

Vitamin B2: Helps in using phosphorus. Also helps in increasing colour texture of body. Helps in increasing fertility rate. Increases rate of hunger. Also helps in maintaining calcium phosphorus balance in body.

Vitamin B6: Maintains nervous system and motor neurons.

Vitamin B12: Increases psychological power in body

Vitamin K: Increases disease resistance power in body. Keeps mass inside the body fit

Vitamin D: Flow of calcium is with the help of vitamin D. Increases power in bones.

Vitamin E: Helps in use of selenium in body. Increases milk production. Decreases the time gap between rate of birth of two calves

Calcium: Useful in psychological changes. Increases milk production, for fertility rate, increases digestion power,

Phosphorus: Flexibility in bones, shine in hair, proper use of energy generated in body, fertility rate is depended on phosphorus, maintains quantity of milk,

Magnesium: Helps in utilizing calcium, for making milk magnesium helps in lots of senses

Zinc: Maintains resistance power within body, reduces dryness of skin

Iron: Increases haemoglobin within blood

Sulphur: Helps in digestion

Copper: Helps in developing female seeds which helps in increasing fertility rate, develops RBC in blood, tightens hair roots helping in loss in hair

Cobalt: Maintains Smoothness on skin. Tones the skin, production of milk within body

Manganese: Develops and maintains female seeds, increase in bone size

Selenium: Keeps uterus healthy and clean helping in time of pregnancy for calf within the uterus

Potassium: Maintains water balance with the body, maintains urinal outlet infection free

Iodine: Keeps thyroid glands in normal form.

Chromium: Helps in working of RBC

Why are amino acids said to be the source of life?

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Posted on 8th April 2010 by Swapnil Waikar in Uncategorized

Many theories have been presented to explain the origin of life: Some claim that life is of extraterrestrial origin, some believe that life began in the atmosphere, and some hold that the sea is the cradle of life. In all cases, however, amino acids are said to be the source of life.

Some meteorites that collided with the earth after a long journey from the remotest corner of the universe contained amino acids. Trace amounts of glycine, alanine, glutamate and alanine were detected in a meteorite that struck Murchison (Australia) in 1969. The amino acids in meteorites are considered to be a trace of life elsewhere in the universe. A trilobite fossil dating back 500 million years was found to contain the amino acid alanine. Science continues its search for an answer to the intriguing mystery of the origin of life by studying the amino acids detected in fossils and meteorites.

Well it makes proud to tell you all that we are having 20 amino acids in potentise form in all our Nanosolutions products.

Effects of Gibberellic Acid

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Posted on 3rd April 2010 by Swapnil Waikar in Uncategorized

1. Overcoming dormancy: Treatment with high concentrations of GA is effective in overcoming dormancy and causing rapid germination of seed. Concentrations of about 2 ppm can cause tubers to sprout earlier.
2. Premature flowering: If a plant is sufficiently developed, premature flowering may be induced by direct application of GA to young plants. This action is not sustained and treatment may have to be repeated. Formation of male flowers is generally promoted by concentrations of 10 to 200 ppm., female flowers by concentrations of 200 to 300 ppm. Concentrations of more than 600 ppm markedly suppresses initiation of both male and female flowers.
3. Increased fruit set: When there is difficulty with fruit set because of incomplete pollination, GA may be effectively used to increase fruit set. The resulting fruit maybe partially or entirely seedless. GA has increased the total yield in greenhouse tomato crops both as a result of increased fruit set and more rapid growth of the fruit.
4. Hybridizing: Pollination within self-incompatible clones and between closely related species may some times be forced by the application of GA and cytokinin to the blooms at the time of hand pollination.
5. Increased growth: GA applied near the terminal bud of trees may increase the rate of growth by stimulating more or less constant growth during the season. In a Department of Agriculture experiment, the GA was applied as a 1% paste in a band around the terminal bud of trees. Treatment was repeated three times during the summer.
6. Frost protection: Spraying fruit trees at full-blossom or when the blossoms begin to wither can offset the detrimental effects of frost.
7. Root formation: GA inhibits the formation of roots in cuttings.
We at Nanosolutions™ have been using mainly amino acids and other various minerals as a nutrient for plants. As we think, Gibberellic acid may create problems for humans in future. Hence, we never use such kinds of acids that might create problems in near future. We always think healthy life is through healthy eating and we can eat healthy only when the crop & soil is free of chemicals.
We have observed that after sharing this thought with our grapes clients they shifted towards Hortiklik™ for betterment of human beings.

Nanosolutions™ joins hands to work with Pune based NGO Green Hills Group.

5 comments

Posted on 23rd March 2010 by Swapnil Waikar in Uncategorized

I still remembered summer was just to start when I got a call from Mr. Sanjay Athawale, and on the same day, we both decided to meet. He is one of the active members of Green Hills Group Pune. The most important thing for me was to understand what exactly Green Hills Group does for Puneties. Well when Sanjay told me that they have planted more than 1000 trees of various varieties on Chaturshingi Hill top, he also told that they have started working on Ram Tekadi. Moreover, at that moment I decided to work with them. I told Sanjay that whatever help your NGO requires in concern with plant health we at Nanosolutions are ready to help you at any step. Before that, I personally went on hill to see what kind of plantation they have done, and I was surprised to see some varieties, which I had only heard and not seen. I told Sanjay & his team about my company and its interaction with farmers. I also tried to explain him & his team about our concept and how our product works. We then decided to start the use of Hortiklik initially with a dose of 0.5ml/plant with a gap of 15days. Then after a gap of one year when we again met I got a review from Sanjay that how they got wonderful results of Hortiklik on all their species and I was happy to hear the same from him. The results, which I got from Sanjay, were, that in summer, also the leaves were bright green, and there were any hardly deficiencies found on any plant. From then onwards we decided to help towards nature lover and we can also call then warriors who are saving our planet earth from global warming to give continuous supply of Hortiklik free of cost till the day they require and also to provide some small formulas of making soil more and more organic.  We hope our small help to them will help them in some or other way.